Stage 1 - The Strongback

247
247

Describe your image.

press to zoom
216
216

Describe your image.

press to zoom
215
215

Describe your image.

press to zoom
1/1

The trusses formed the "Strongback" for the canoe forms, holding them alligned firmly in place.

Stage 2 - The Forms

20160218_185438
20160218_185438

Describe your image.

press to zoom
20160218_185417
20160218_185417

Describe your image.

press to zoom
20160218_190318
20160218_190318

Describe your image.

press to zoom
1/1

The Forms are cut from 3/4" plywood, taken from the plans to create the shape, length and width of the hull.  This is where the design decisions are carried out.

Stage 3 - The Stems

IMG_07161
IMG_07161

Describe your image.

press to zoom
IMG_07191
IMG_07191

Describe your image.

press to zoom
246
246

Describe your image.

press to zoom
1/1

Stems are needed to have attachment points for the cedar strips and to provide shape and strength to the bow and stern. Inner stems are Cedar and the outer ones are Ash.

Stage 4 - Laying The Strips

242
242

Describe your image.

press to zoom
250
250

Describe your image.

press to zoom
IMG_07201
IMG_07201

Describe your image.

press to zoom
1/1

About 100 cedar strips, 3/4" wide, 1/4" thick are laid across the forms and glued along their edges.  Staples hold them temporarily to the forms until all are installed and the glue has dried.  Each row is fitted to the next with bead and cove edging for a snug fit.

Stage 5 - Sanding & Shaping The Outer Hull

IMG_08281
IMG_08281

Describe your image.

press to zoom
IMG_08301
IMG_08301

Describe your image.

press to zoom
IMG_09131
IMG_09131

Describe your image.

press to zoom
1/1

After strips are laid and staples all removed, a process of sanding, planing and wood filling provides the final smooth shape of the hull and prepares it for fiberglass cloth and epoxy.  Lots of hard work and dust, so masks and safety glasses are worn.  You can see dust accumulation on the floor, even with the dust collection system running!

Stage 6 - Coating The Outer Hull With Epoxy

IMG_08931
IMG_08931

Describe your image.

press to zoom
IMG_08901
IMG_08901

Describe your image.

press to zoom
20160727_144315 (1)
20160727_144315 (1)
press to zoom
1/1

Fiberglass cloth covers the hull, inside and out.  It is bonded to the hull with epoxy resin which is extremely tough and provides a waterproof sheath to the boat.  The real strength of cedar strip canoes is in the sandwich effect of fiberglass and epoxy bonded to both sides of the cedar strips. Highly resilient and good impact strength with light weight.  You get 20 minutes or less working time with epoxy, so you have to be set up and keep moving!  

Stage 7 - Off The Forms

IMG_1049_2
IMG_1049_2

Describe your image.

press to zoom
IMG_09161
IMG_09161

Describe your image.

press to zoom
IMG_1047_1 (2)
IMG_1047_1 (2)
press to zoom
1/1

Once the outer hull has dried, it is removed from the forms.  This is the first chance to see the inner hull and really get a good idea of the overall shape of the boat..  The inner hull is then sanded and smoothed, ready to epoxy.

Final Stages

The last steps involve gunwales, decks, thwarts, seats and a keel. Then several coats of spar varnish to protect from water and sun.

First Water - The launching of "Jolene"

On December 9, 2016, we were able to get Jolene  (her official name) out for a short paddle on the pond at the Rural. It was chilly and nobody wanted to risk dumping, but it was a thrill to see her in the water and to get a feel for our boat.  Handling was excellent and she moves very quickly when everyone is in sync.